fredagen den 4:e december 2009

Transrationalism (was: People and Rationalism)

The Russian Futurists in the early 20th century actually launched an excellent concept for what Ardeshir is describing, namely "transrationalism". Transrationalism can be understood as a rationalism undertaken with the explicit advance knowledge that rationalism on its own is limited - as the post-structuralists following Nietzsche later pointed out too - and that a wider understanding of the world has to take in information which can not be viewed as explictly "rational". I would add that taking a transrational stance is an act of intellectual modesty. Rationalism can only take us this far. Beyond the limit of rationalism we need other means, such as Art or what Ardeshir refer to as "Wisdom" and "Intuition" to understand the world and our existential condition better. In this sense, it would be correct to call Zarathushtra "the original transrationalist".
Ushta
Alexander

2009/12/4 ardeshir farhmand
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> Dear Tomash
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> Zoroastrianism is very rational, however, exactly as u said its form of rationality has nothing to do with the "cult of the so-caled scientific rationalism" of the 18th and 19th century.
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> Zoroastrianism puts immense emphahsis on "intuitive understanding" and "knowledge by seeing" and goodthinking/genius.
> Vision, Wisdom, Ingenuity, Imagination and Creativity summon up the Zoroastrian Supreme Force/God.
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> In addition, Zoroastrianism enjoins the widening of one's bewusstsein/consciousness into better/more luminous possibilities and higher truths that yet need to be realized in our mundane world of limitations.
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> Ardeshir
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> On Fri, Dec 4, 2009 at 8:44 AM, tomispev wrote:
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>> Zdravo,
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>> I was interested about Zoroastrian views on Rationalism in the modern world. As I mentioned before, I studied a bit about Stoicism, which is a very rationalistic philosophy.
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>> Many people today claim they are rational, but is this the same as being an adept of rationalism? How can we tell if we are rational? Did at some point rationalism become a form of idolatry of reason? Instead of being rational people are only thinking they are rational, instead of thinking rationally they are rationalizing.
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>> I have the feeling I'm tossing terms too much around here. I had a D in philosophy. :-)
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>> What I'm interested partly what is the Zoroastrian stance(s) on rational, rationalism and rationalizing.
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>> Pozdrav,
>> Tomash

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