tisdagen den 21:e september 2010

The Occult and Pagan side of Mithraism (as Zoroastrian Philosophy put into practice)

Well, I couldn't agree more!!!
I much prefer my "Zoroastrianism" to be both occult and pagan. As opposed to the cleansed and wholesome variety that imitates the Abrahamic faiths and their rituals.
Religious meetings should take place at night and not at 11.00am on Sundays. For example.
So I go with Pagan (meaning anything that is NOT Abrahamic in old Rome) and with PHILOSOPHICALLY Zoroastrian. So the best title for the religion I want to belong to is Mithraism.
You and Parviz have moved along the same lines now for quite some time. ;-)
Brotherly love
Alexander

2010/9/21 Special Kain

Dear Alexander, there are WORLDS between occultism and Satanism.
But all this really sounds like 19th secret societies where curious minds (and bored and spoiled brats) would gather to perform magical rituals, take drugs and discuss philosophical and social issues. Like the famous "hashish club" or Crowley's Thelemic groups. This is exactly what I got into when I was 17, and it was hilariously fascinating!
When I read "Netocracy" the first time, this is also the picture I got. More wires, less robes.

Ushta,
Dino


--- Alexander Bard schrieb am Mo, 20.9.2010:

Von: Alexander Bard
Betreff: Re: [Ushta] Re: Mithraism or Mazdaism
An: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
Datum: Montag, 20. September, 2010 21:53 Uhr


Dear Dino
Now I follow you. Occult as in obscura, Latin for darkness. Not as in Satanism. Sure! The rituals are only for the initiated, something that I think will be both necessary and extremely attractive in a society where people due to the internet expose everything about themselves to anybody. This is precisely what is attractive about Mithraism. I have personally just started googling Mithraism as a contemporary phenomen so I welcome any tips myself.
Ushta
Alexander

2010/9/20 Special Kain

The occult refers to rituals and beliefs that are practiced in secrecy. Things that are not made public. No prayer gatherings in broad daylight where everybody could see what they were doing.
So it could be appropriate to refer to Mithraist gatherings as occultist, but I admit that it would be historically inaccurate, since the term "occultism" was born in the Middle Ages. Nevertheless, it is what Mithraism has reminded me of. ;-)
What I learned from my experience with European occultist secret societies is that, metaphorically speaking, everyone should write their own book instead!!!
And, frankly, the only thing left to say about Christianity these days is that there is no reason to go to church other than marvel at the beauty of architecture.
So what's a great source about Mithraism? Can you recommend any good website?

Ushta,
Dino

--- Alexander Bard schrieb am Mo, 20.9.2010:

Von: Alexander Bard
Betreff: Re: [Ushta] Re: Mithraism or Mazdaism
An: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
Datum: Montag, 20. September, 2010 17:07 Uhr


Not really.

The word occult is totally inappropriate here. Mithraism existed independently of or even before Christianity and was therefore NOT some Satanic or Occult cult.
Raher it was a CYCLIST religion put in practice and as such perfect for a modern post-secular religious or metaphysical experience. The bullfighting in Spain and France is a typical remnant of Mithraic culture.
And the exclusion of women is a myth. Many mithraea have traces of women found in them, including seating especially reserved for women. It's just that Mithraism was especially popular among soldiers in the Roman Empire who happened to be men. That's all.
It's just that Mithraism is surrounded by so much Christian bullshit it is unbelievable. But then again, Mithraism was (and perhaps still is) the chief opponent to Christianity.
Ushta
Alexander

2010/9/20 Special Kain

We only know very little about Mithraist philosophy, dear Syn. For example, what we know for certain is that there were occultist secret societies where everybody was welcome to join - except for women. They were obsessed with astronomy and astrology. But since they were forbidden to tell anybody else about their secret rituals, we don't know what was really going on in those caves.
Mithraism - including its rich symbolism - reminds me of our contemporary occultist secret societies that are devoted followers of Aleister Crowley's and other 19th century-born occultists' philosophies.

Ushta,
Dino

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