söndagen den 28:e februari 2010

God of having colds

You may suffer from your cold, but the germs in your body are having a ball and enjoying every second of it. So why not look at it as if your body is the party temple of happy germs? That is what monism means to me. Death is this way a feast for worms.
Ushta
Alexander/is having a cold too...

2010/2/28 Parviz Varjavand

Dear friends,

I have a very nasty cold and I keep calling on God all the time for help. But I have noticed even in my high fever that this God I call on has nothing to do with the Monist God I normally like to communicate with. This God must live outside His creation and be all powerful in order to pull me out of my situation miraculously. So, If I get well, I will go back to my Monist God that is my friend and companion and dwells in his/her creation. But for now when I get high fever and coughs that threaten to choke me, I need the other God, the mightily nasty one with extra ingredients of irrational powers. I am very needy when sick and I can't help but want an extra strenght God to take care of me. Help me O'Lord, I beg you, I beg you, you are the God of sick beggars like me, have pity on me, have pity on me.

Parviz

onsdagen den 24:e februari 2010

Tano Pasino (not an Italian Bistro!) Part 2

Exactly!!!
Hierarchy is alien to Zoroastrian thinking.
The whole point with believing in ONE world and a SACRED world as such is that there is no objective hierarchy precisely because WE as minds value the world but there is no exterior mind to value the world for us. There is no better world waiting for us in teh future, we live in there here and now, and the world evolves and changes for THE GOOD OF CHANGE; not for the good of superiority.
This is why all belief in Hierarchy is absolutely alien to Zarathushtra, the author of The Gathas. Let such nutty ideas die with Platonism and the Abrahamic faiths. We don't need it and we don't want it.
Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/24 mehmet azizoglu

Dear Alex,
I totally agree with you..there is no "better" being that we are going to evolve into. In evolutionary biology there is no better or worst evolutionary phase that creatures experience, but rather simple and complex ones (with regards to each other)

It is the great biologist Ernst Mayr who blames Plato's essentialism behind the poor and very late understanding of evolution by us, and I think he is quite right. Our mind has been (and is still) twisted by Plato and subsequent Abrahamic teaching to see that we human being blessed by God are on top ladder down to the inferior creatures...

Thanks to Darwin who helped us ponder our existance in more reasonable way

Ushta

Mehmett

Tano Pasino (not an Italian Bistro !)

Charles Darwin would say that we evolve into a DIFFERENT kind of being from what we have been. Always and constantly. But he would never be so stupid as to say that we evolve into a BETTER kind of being.
The whole idea that there is a hieracrhy between suprior and inferior beings smacks of Plato and Abrahamism. The whole point with Zarathushtra's philosophy is instead to train us to NOT think in terms of hierarchy. There are no better or worse creatures in creation. And there never will be.
That is precisely why ALL of creation is sacred in Zoroastrianism.
Ushta
Alexander/perfectly happy to keep my current body and "the sins" within it too...

2010/2/24 Parviz Varjavand

Dear Ardeshir,

It would be very nice of you to point out my mistakes, I would love to learn from you.
Yes, according to Darwin, we would evolve to a differant creature some day not very soon, but it would not be along the lines of sheding our flesh and become a Tano Pasino kind of creature made of light and free of the sin's of the body. Darwin's kind of science is the kind I belive in but I know that you belive in new frontiers of noetic-science where we will soon be able to see the Jinns by wearing a special kind of glasses or becomes creatures of pure light by shedding our flesh and its sins.

Your friend,
Parviz Varjavand

--- On Tue, 2/23/10, ardeshir farhmand wrote:

From: ardeshir farhmand
Subject: Re: [Ushta] Tano Pasino (not a new Italian Bistro !)
To: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
Cc: "Parviz Varjavand"
Date: Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 8:53 PM


hahahahaha

Dear Parviz,

charles darwin probably would probably agree that man's evolution is NOT final, we will evolve into a better, more advanced specie in the future, hopefully. i am always amazed at ur sense of humor and ur remarkable ability to TWIST things so masterfully around.

CHEERS

ardeshir

On Tue, Feb 23, 2010 at 8:24 PM, Parviz Varjavand wrote:

Buyer beware.

So far we have Ervad Pervez D. Mithaiwala teaching us that: >>"... a Zerthosti Rawaan segregates in two parts, say A and B. Part A – a set of three and B comprising of nine, are better known as Rawaan of KSHNAOTHRA AHURAHE MAZADAAO ( Male child) and SPENTA ARMAITY (Female child)respectively. On its yet downward trend, Rawaan of Part A involves itself in constant utterance of “KSHNAOTHRA AHURAHE MAZADAAO”, meaning Glory be Yours, AHURAMAZDA. The moment recitation of this prolific prayer ceases, forces of evil attempt vehement attack but at this juncture, Rawaan of other part B, Spentaa Armaity rushes to its rescue and absorbs the brunt. Whereas the Rawaan of part A enters body of a child in male form, that of B in female physique (Part B). On releasing itself from influence of Burjis Aasmaan, i.e.on achieving state of adolescence, the ugly aura absorbed at instance of bearing brunt, is unleashed in form of menses."<<

We also have the Tano Pasino teaching where Ardeshir Farahmand tells us that: >>"There will be a wonderful transformation of matter, a new and transformed physical body marked by lightness, amazing adaptability, plasticity and luminosity. The new physical will be full of consciousness/ minoo which will drive out all that interia and incapacity which makes matter a drag on the mind/spirit. The bodily transformation will be the culmination of the spiritual rebirth and --adding one more amazing step to the ladder of eternal progress."<<

If you are clever, you will see that the two teachings are the two sides of the same coin and teachings of Mani where the spiritual and the material are considered separate, one dark and bad and ugly like menses blood, the other full of light and luminosity and withought any imperfection, like the Minoo of Ahura Mazda which originally made the world perfect before an afflicted Man brought Sin into it.

Mazdeism or the version of Mazda-yasna I teach is free of such Dark-Light preocupations. Ardeshir calls me a Marxist; if I am one, then Charles Darwin is a Marxist too. (Curse be on Charles Darwin for opening our eyes!)

Mehr Afzoon,
Parviz Varjavand

måndagen den 22:e februari 2010

A pristine world (with no humans in it), really?

Dear Parviz, Ardeshir and friends

As far as I'm concerned, the word "perfection" did not exist in the Avesta language to begin with.
And if the concept of "haurvatat" is what we discuss here, it's not only a term hard to translate to contemporary English but it is also a concept which is always placed in the distant future as an abstract goal by Zarathushtra.
Zarathushtra recommends us to see the world as good in itself, yes, - THROUGH OUR OWN CHOICE - but that is not the same thing as to say that the world IS good in itself. The world just is. Please don't try to sneak Abrahamism into Zoroastrianism again through the backdoor. OK? There is no external judge who has set values for us in Zoroastrianism. We set the values ourselves AS WE SEE FIT.
That is the whole point with Mazdayasna: To realise that we as subjects are our own judges. Nobody else judges for us.

Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/22 Parviz Varjavand

My two cents,

Ardeshir's vision is fascinating and I will have to sit back and just enjoy it, like watching the Avatar film ;-) So far we have Perfect Mind (Minoo) creating our world (Guity) perfect, but we humans plus some other entities (Jinns and cows, I guess) bring evil into it with their wrong choices (choices like humans deciding to walk upright ;-) . This is one rehashing of the story of the Fall and nothing more, but let us enjoy it when told by an artist as skilled as Ardeshir.

About your comments, Bahman, if you want a perfect Guity created by a perfect Minoo and not corrupted yet, go live on Mars or Pluto. Since there is no life there, the perfect Minoo ardeshir adores can play in perfect harmony there as there is no life there to usher in Evil yet.

As far as I am concerned, Guity or the world has to come first for life to evolve out of the mud in it and as this life form evolves, it gets a mind and Minoo is this mind creating a mental world (Jahane Minavi) for itself. To turn this equation the other way around makes us end with a story of the Fall (Hoboot) and tries to put a perfect Mind in the skies that can not Sin and we humans down here responsible for bringing about Evil by our wrong choices (sins). A very muddy vision full of useless guilt and nothing more.

Yours in friendship,
Parviz Varjavand

--- On Sun, 2/21/10, ardeshir farhmand wrote:

From: ardeshir farhmand
Subject: Re: [Ushta] a pristine world
To: "Bahman Noruziaan"
Cc: kamran.jamshidi@gmail.com, "mehrdad farahmand" , Ushta@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, February 21, 2010, 10:17 AM


Dear Bahman,

material manifestation was beautiful, pristine and far less rigid. the wrong CHOICES
turned it into rigid and limited. please look at the first chapters of the farvardin yasht in addition to the poetic gathas, for they provide an illuminating commentary.

and u are bringing another good point. evil has not to do just with human choices. it also encompasses wrong choices by other beings/powers, past remnants of other creations that stopped growing and evolving, the hostile force or daevas.

power of choosing is GOOD, now, if material manifestations choose to make wrong decisions with their power to choose is a wholly different matter. it does not make the material world evil. ur point is correct; evil CREPT later into the material universe, it was NOT there to begin with. but it came about as a result of STUPIDITY and not just the stupidity of humankind, but other conscious entities/energies and was magnified by humans later.

MAZYASNA does NOT see the material world as evil or even remotely as the cause of the evil. it looks at evil as a by-product of WRONG CHOICES by CONSCIOUS BEINGS/ENERGIES, human or non-human.

and calls evil a delusion becz it has no permanent/lasting quality, it is temporary and will disappear, as soon as it has served its purpose in the learning/growth process of the universe. evil will disappear, since it has no place in the fabric of being or existence it simply will melt away as material universe evolves and grows and becomes more dynamic and intelligent.

remember "anygra" comes from the root "ag" namely beaten: it simply means a beaten, depleted mind/spirit; limited, stagnated, and unable to grow and unable to be dynamic anymore.

good and evil depends on choices and on understanding/ wit/mind/ spirit/MINOO and if it is auspicious, growing and vibrant, OR beaten, stagnated and limited.
the whole depiction in Yasna 30 is about the passion/energy level/vibrant power of consciousness in general, not about human minds necessarily.

limiting it to the human mind is the much later insertion and wrong deduction of some western scholars and dr. jaffary in particular, talking about APOLOGIST reasoning, this is a good instance of such.

ardeshir

On Sun, Feb 21, 2010 at 9:03 AM, Bahman Noruziaan wrote:
Hello Ardeshir,

Humans lie, hurt, kill and do other "evils" or "wrong" or "unrighteous acts".
Humnas are the work of creation and not out of the realm of creation.
Then why such a pristine universe or existence has ended up creating such a wrong doing creature, one wonders?
My understanding from Mazdayasna is that when "Gaiti" came into existence out of "Mainyoo", imperfection, decay, corruption and death and so on crept into the material world.
It was the nature and necessity of this material world to come about.
It does not do anything with our perception nor it is an illusion.
It is the true nature of the material world.

Regards
Bahman

Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 11:25:41 -0800
Subject: Re: [Ushta] a pristine world
From: ardeshir72@gmail. com
To: Ushta@yahoogroups. com
CC: bahman_noruziaan@ hotmail.com; special_kain@ yahoo.de; solvolant@yahoo. com; eeduljee@yahoo. ca

Dear Bahman, Dino, Parviz

let me use an example, let us take sexuality for example; it is good and healthy. a natural, pristine and beautiful force. now when people try with their limited, crude physical mind to turn it into something bad or something to feel guilty about; it becomes a source of tension, suffering, guilt, shame, honor killings and.........

yet it is good and wonderful in essence. it is the wrong choices based on crude, limited physical minds that created ideas like say abstinence, monk hood and .... that turn this pristine goodness into a cause of suffering, disease and guilt.

and exactly similar crude choices on various levels have prevented the physical universe to manifest itself from being less rigid, more luminous and flexible.

and parviz, about ur contention that the physical is the source of mind/spirit, i disagree with u 1000%. the fact is that such materialistic ideas that u try give them scientific credibility are being discredited more and more in the scientific community.
true, still some hold out to such outdated and fossilized ideas among scientists, but their materialistic views has come under serious questioning and assault, as horizons are widening in every scientific field.

what u like to label as ur brand of "Mazdaism" is nothing more than an evolved and refined "Marxism," with pure supremacy given to the unfinished and still evolving material over anything else. and u even admitted it in ur last correspondence, when u declared that matter has given birth to mind/spirit and not the other way around.

as i said, i do ENJOY ur oppositions and read them with interest and fun. however, it is my firm belief that humans are utterly in love with their own limitations and inferiority, and can NOT bear to admit a higher possibility /reality. this desire to deny a higher and more evolved reality and stick to our crude, limited, physical humanity and call all else a fantasy is the very stamp of humanity and the very cause of misery and suffering in the world. take it with good cheers and my best wishes.

ardeshir

onsdagen den 10:e februari 2010

Pathos, not politics!

Dear Parviz

I really and truly honestly believe that the world would be a much better and more fascinating place if dualism was just gone. It has nothing to do with politics but everything to do with my pathos. This is why I prefer to deal with modern atheists who find atheism shortcoming and are looking for NEW ways of living life spiritually and creatively fulfilling than dealing once more with the old dualists trying to find excuses to act stupidly as if Nietzsche's tearing down of their pants had never happened. Let's make new and fresh and exciting things, history has only become a burden (I even envy Zarathushtra and his generation in this sense, they had no history to relate to, wonderful!). Having said this. I don't mind traditions, of course I don't, and I love our traditions within Z (spending some time in Mobed Jamshidi's white prayer room at the European Zoroastrian Center in Paris last week was wonderful!!!), but spare me the dualist rabble. Please.

Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/10 Parviz Varjavand

Dear Alex,

My post was not an old post, so why did you change its title if you are addressing the issue I brought up? I like it that you are a good politician and do not want to irritate others, I wish I could also do things as tactfully as you. But you know Alex, if you become too much of a politician, others will not wake up to notice fine points.You know what I am talking about, so why do you try not to let others develop a sensitivity to the smell, the smell of a Platonist world view gone dead, a Minoo up there basking in its perfection and a Guity down here caught in mundane imperfection struggling to get Up-There. We need to develop a sensitive nose for the smell of this dead idea, no matter how poetically and beautifully it is being expressed.

I know a lot of Masnavi by hard and I enjoy chanting it, Rumi's poetry is truly beautiful and relaxing to get drunk on. One of my friends, Parviz Sahabi, who was a student of Allameye Jafarey (a great Persian scholar of Rumi's Masnavi) conducts seminars teaching Rumi. In his class once, I just mentioned that I smell this smell and they had to kick me out of the Seminar. They could not stand the fact that all their bells and whistles was so that they would be able to keep a dead concept alive in-spite of the smell in the air.

Why do you think they chant and burn so much incense in the Churches? It is to keep the smell down. Our concepts should be boldly frank and fresh, otherwise the fumes of incense and the chanting of poetry will drown the smell and no one will notice that something is dead here, no one but a few like you and Dino.

Yours as always,
Parviz


--- On Wed, 2/10/10, Alexander Bard wrote:

From: Alexander Bard
Subject: [Ushta] Zarathushtra in the Gathas vs Zarathustra in Nietzsche's philosophy
To: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 2:29 AM


When Friedrich Nietzsche's Zarathushtra said that God is dead he meant that the PLATONIST IDEA was dead.
The idea that there is a perfect world superior to our imperfect world is dead. This is death of OBJECTIVITY and the realisation that all truths are by necessity subjective and this is something we have to deal with.
Nietzsche's dead God certainly does NOT include Ahura Mazda. Instead, Nietzsche would be a strong proponent of Ahura and quite likely of Mazda too. His central ethical concept of "amor fati" is as Zoroastrian as anything could possibly be. It could just as well have come from Zarathushtra's own mouth in The Gathas.
The widespread idea that Nietzsche picked Zarathushtra by chance has repeatedly been proven wrong. Nietzsche was well versed in Sanskrit and Avesta since he was a professor of PHILOLOGY rather than Philosophy and there was a tremendous scholar interest in all things Indo-Iranian in Germany in the mid 19th century.
Nietzsche also confirms this himself in his later work "Ecce Homo" where he states that he picked Zarathushtra as his lead figure since he saw Zarathushtra's deliberations as the Birth of Ethics in human history (or the birth of moral philosophy, as most translations to English would suggest). Who would then be better suited to ask the questions confronting modern man than Zarathushtra himself?
Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/10 Parviz Varjavand

I feel that there are two Zarathustras. One is the Zarathustra of the Gathas, the other is the Zarathustra of Nietzsche. When Nietzsche's Zarathustra said that "God is Dead", was he also talking about Ahoora Mazda? When so many of us talk about Ahoora Mazda, we argue very hard that He/She is not dead like the others, but why is there a slight smell of death in the air? We will not get rid of that smell if we do not make a clean break with the other Dead Paradigms. Who amongst us is doing this? We need a new Zoroastrianism that Nietsche would want to convert to, not one that fools would gravitate to in order to dull the pain of their meaningless existences.

Zoroastrian kids on You Tube

I agree 100% with Dino.
This is why Nietzsche's "amor fati" is a much more Zoroastrian motto than the deceitfulness of "positive thinking". The "constructive thinking" of Zarathushtra is honest and straight-forward and open and tolerant and self-critical, but it is neither positive nor negative but rather neutral in that regard.
But always nice with cute kids doing their best on You Tube! We need more of that.
Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/10 Special Kain

Dear Bahman

It's really cute!!! It's great to see young kids being creative and smart! Because their minds are the future.
But what's less good is the fact that Zarathushtra's motto is often mixed up with that dreadful doctrine of "positive thinking". That kid's video has just reminded me of the North American cult following where people who think critically and voice their concerns are being sacked - only because they allegedly have spoiled the company's working atmosphere.
That's why we have to teach the world that our motto is not about good or positive thoughts, but about constructive thoughts leading to constructive words leading to constructive deeds - and that there's a huge difference between "positive thinking" (self-deceit) and a constructive mentality that starts with being brutally honest with ourselves and taking this as our starting point when making the wisest choice possible.
"Positive thinking" usually makes everything worse, Zarathushtra's motto is totally devoted to wisdom, creativity and smart decisions. It would be smart and wise to reject that doctrine of "positive thinking".

Ushta,
Dino

--- Bahman Noruziaan schrieb am Mi, 10.2.2010:

Von: Bahman Noruziaan
Betreff: [Ushta] Zoroastrianism from a youth's point of view
An: "mainstream main" , "Mazdayasna Mazdayasna" , "Ushta Ushta"


This is a youth's view of Zoroastrianism. It is nice I think.

http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=r2q6IdKWA64

Zarathushtra in the Gathas vs Zarathustra in Nietzsche's philosophy

When Friedrich Nietzsche's Zarathushtra said that God is dead he meant that the PLATONIST IDEA was dead.
The idea that there is a perfect world superior to our imperfect world is dead. This is death of OBJECTIVITY and the realisation that all truths are by necessity subjective and this is something we have to deal with.
Nietzsche's dead God certainly does NOT include Ahura Mazda. Instead, Nietzsche would be a strong proponent of Ahura and quite likely of Mazda too. His central ethical concept of "amor fati" is as Zoroastrian as anything could possibly be. It could just as well have come from Zarathushtra's own mouth in The Gathas.
The widespread idea that Nietzsche picked Zarathushtra by chance has repeatedly been proven wrong. Nietzsche was well versed in Sanskrit and Avesta since he was a professor of PHILOLOGY rather than Philosophy and there was a tremendous scholar interest in all things Indo-Iranian in Germany in the mid 19th century.
Nietzsche also confirms this himself in his later work "Ecce Homo" where he states that he picked Zarathushtra as his lead figure since he saw Zarathushtra's deliberations as the Birth of Ethics in human history (or the birth of moral philosophy, as most translations to English would suggest). Who would then be better suited to ask the questions confronting modern man than Zarathushtra himself?
Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/10 Parviz Varjavand

I feel that there are two Zarathustras. One is the Zarathustra of the Gathas, the other is the Zarathustra of Nietzsche. When Nietzsche's Zarathustra said that "God is Dead", was he also talking about Ahoora Mazda? When so many of us talk about Ahoora Mazda, we argue very hard that He/She is not dead like the others, but why is there a slight smell of death in the air? We will not get rid of that smell if we do not make a clean break with the other Dead Paradigms. Who amongst us is doing this? We need a new Zoroastrianism that Nietsche would want to convert to, not one that fools would gravitate to in order to dull the pain of their meaningless existences.

tisdagen den 9:e februari 2010

The Ongoing Process (was: The Enchanting Immortals)

While Greek thught was divided between process philosophers like Heraclitus and dualists like Plato, they got their inspiration from either Iranian thinking (such as Heraclitus) or Egyptian thinking (such as Plato). This is important when we look the Greek term logos which therefore can mean both "establishment of movement" and "establishment of fact". In the Bible, it is clearly the Platinist view which dominates, this is for example obvious in the famous first chapter of The Gospel of John. But here it is important that we stress that Zarathushtra was a process philosopher (which goes for Iranian and also Indian thinking in general) and that when HE and his contemporaires speak of "word" they do so precisely in the meaning that Kamran enlightens us with. So here I would agree that both Dino and Kamran are 100%. And Dino is right to stress that a consequence of process philosophy is that it is by nature devoid of morality (morality requires a non-changing existence since valuations and their base are non-changing) but instead focuses on ETHICS as the basis for values and valuations. We could therefore not arrive further from the Abrahamic religions and Platonism than this. There is nothing to heal in Zoroastrianism, no sins to forgive, no links to ressurect. Instread there are endless possibilities for US as Mazdayasni to choose to materialize. We give meaning to existence as we choose to give meaning to existence, meaning is not external to us, arriving to us as a doomed fact (the way it does in Abrahamic Re-Ligions). Strictly speaking, Mazdayasna is therefore not a Re-Ligion, it is a Mazda-Yasna (a Philo-Sophia).
Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/9 Kamran Jamshidi

Dear "hamporses" (the meaning comes later in this text!)

Let us now have a little "word" play which could be interesting. It is for me anyway.

Lets take the word " ruvishni/ growth/progress" mentioned by Ardeshir, as it is one of the main words/concepts of our philosophy/world view.

{note: It is really a challenge to put a vast concept into short sentences/text and both could explain what you want to say and yet not become tiresome/boring!!}

So let me put it this way:

1- First let us look at the word "word" itself!

In Persian/Farsi "word" means vâzh(e) = vâch(e) = wax (to grow) = växa (= wax in Swedish) , and of course many other forms/variations which if needed could be taken them into account also later.

So a word is something that grows/varies/take different forms. It is not "absolute". Everyone may see/choose some of its forms! So we all grow with words. we seek their meanings together. We are doing "ham-porsi" (to seek/search together. It does not mean to ask each other but ask/search with each other!)

this is one of the meanings/interpretations of "ruvishni" = "ravân" = "urvân" (spirit!?) . It is why urvar=plant, and it is why "Ameretât" symbolizes "plants"=growth.

one other interesting form of "word" = vakhsh= rakhsh=rakhs=raghs (to dance!) . The "creation/generation=growth" is a cosmic dance! (sounds familiar?)

Let us stop here and get reactions/reflections. For example what "word" means in other related languages.
"Ord" in Swedish Alex?

Kamran


2010/2/9 Special Kain


Dear Ardeshir

This perfectly demonstrates - once again! - that Zarathushtra was concerned with The Ongoing Process (as a metaphysical concept) rather than The Static Being. Zarathushtra was the first process philosopher in a long line with Heraclitus, Charles Darwin, Friedrich Nietzsche, Alfred N. Whitehead, Gilles Deleuze and the pragmatists and existentialists. When many philosophers and thinkers would see The Ongoing Process as a good reason to establish a sense of alienation, Zarathushtra was one of the thinkers that actually would praise this concept.

My two cents,
Dino

--- ardeshir farhmand schrieb am Mo, 8.2.2010:

Von: ardeshir farhmand
Betreff: Re: [Ushta] The enchanting immortals
An: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
CC: kamran.jamshidi@gmail.com
Datum: Montag, 8. Februar 2010, 23:12


Dear Alexander, Parviz and Mobed Kamran,

on haurvatat and ameretat or "weal " and "imperishablity/ indestructabilit y"
the ancient exegesis translates them respectively as hamishak ruvishni; forever growth/progress- ---and amrag ruvishnish: etrenal/deathless growth/progress;

just wanted to add that to our ancient sages the duo simply represented the idea of "weal/wellbeing and eternal/imperish able progress and growth.
by the way the greek "amborsia" seem to be very close!!!
just another thought

ardeshir

On Mon, Feb 8, 2010 at 12:33 PM, Kamran Jamshidi wrote:

And just another thought:
Haurvatât ameretât are almost always together.
Another simple and yet mundane interpretation could be:
ever/long-lasting good/happy life!

As some of you use to say: my 2 cents.

Shâd zi
Kamran Jamshidi

måndagen den 8:e februari 2010

The Enchanting Immortals

Dear Ardeshir

You're doing excellent work clarifying the Zoroastrian texts.
Translations are then always hard to conduct and of course open to different interpretations.
This is why it is wise of you to use several different words for a comparative study.
For example I have always found amesha to be better translated to English as "that which transcends" or just "transcendence" but I find your suggestion "eternity" or "that which transcends time and space" equally good. I just try to avoid the translation "immortality" as much as possible. It is an Egyptian term to me, an Abrahamic concept, that doesn't cover the aspect of ameshta which transcends time and space beyond birth as well as death.
But here we can have many different interpretations and lively and fruitful discussions. Just as an example.

Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/8 ardeshir farhmand
Hi Ushta Alexander, Parviz, Dino,

i am humbled by ur kind words, there were HEAVY storms in my part of los angeles, and that is why i was not participating. i thank all fellow zoroastrians and the entire ushta community for their kind regard. i write based on my understanding and comparative analysis of the ancient exegesis. it is one view among OTHERS, just my small contribution that adds a new dimension and is continuation of some forgotten traditions.
all the best

ardeshir
On Mon, Feb 8, 2010 at 3:38 AM, Parviz Varjavand wrote:

I offer thanks to the Amesha Spentas that Ardeshir is sharing with us his profound thoughts once again. It is a pleasure for me to read his writings even if I do not agree with all that is being expressed. The important thing is that it makes me proud to read a fellow Zoroastrian who does invest all his being in what he writes so elegantly.

Parviz Varjavand

--- On Sun, 2/7/10, ardeshir farhmand wrote:

From: ardeshir farhmand
Subject: [Ushta] the enchanting doctrine of the auspicious immortals
To: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
Cc: "mehrdad farahmand"
Date: Sunday, February 7, 2010, 9:39 PM


Ameshá Speñtá is a beautiful gathic concept of profound importance. It refers to the eternal spirits of ahurmazd or aspects of his wit/profound understanding/ mind/spirit. The term appears in the poetic Gathas as "Mazdá and his power supremes or ahurás/plural," (See Yasna 30.9, second line and Yasna 31.4, first line.) They see the mind/spirit of Mazdá each time reflected anew, and learn/discover yet more of his wisdom and vision. Each time, they discover a brilliant thought and a new vision of Mazdá, they begin a new theme like and yet unlike to the former creation theme, and create new beauty, awe, and wonder in being and time. Mazdá shows them a new vision each time, and they unfold a new reality/world based on this newly discovered vision/wisdom. As it is written in the prelude to the poetic gathas or the "yánim manö" formula, the Ameshá Speñtá took forth the enchanting melody, and held them forth or manifested it in the world. Their role is make the existence brilliant, ever afresh and new.
Ameshá or Amertá means immortality, eternity, forever. Ameshá or Amertá refers to the indestructible, ever-thriving and eternal charm, magnetism and fascinating powers of Ahurmazd, (See Yasna 28.3, second line.) Speñtá on the other hand means auspicious, successful, and having great powers of achievement and realization. It comes from the same exact root as the Vedic Shivá. These Immortals flow from the ever-renewed energy and brilliance of Ahurmazd, (See Yasna 33.8, third line.)
They are the great beings of light and vision. They are the wondrous shapes/vafüsh of God, (See Yasna 29.6, first line.) They are the glorious formations of the spiritual light/knowledge that emanate from the thoughts/vision of Ahurmazd, (See Yasna 31.7, first line and Farvardin Yasht. 81.) Also we read in Mēnōg ī Khirad 8.2 that they are formed from Mazda's own light (az hān ī khwēš rōshnīh), while in the Ayādgār ī Jāmāspīg 3.3-7 their illumination is compared to the lighting of a torch from a torch. They have been kindled with the flame imperishable, See Yasna 46.7, the third line. and their adoration themes is to make being and time brilliant and ever new.They were with Ahurmazd's thought/vision before anything else was made, hence they are called "a-paourvîm," (See Yasna 28.3, the first line.) The term "a-paourvîm" is the same as vedic "apaurashaya," a word which reveals their eternal and ever pristine status. Their number has been cited as 7 (eternity, infinity) and 33 (infinite wisdom.) Yet the best description is in Vispered 8.1, where we read that their number is 50, 100, 1000, 10,000, yet beyond reckoning.
They are masters of their own will, and are of the same passion, will/desire and harmony with Mazdá and each other, (See, Yasna 51.20, the first line.) We read in Yasna 45.4 and Bundahišn 1.44 that Ahurmazd gave them being from his own selfhood, through perfect contemplation. The idea is repeated also in denkard exegesis and also in the bundahishn, (az hān ī khwēš khwadīh.) In other words, they are luminous aspects of God’s own nature.
They are like a new light/vision each time, filling the world with a new wonder and joy, (See Yasna 30, the third line,) For the delight of Mazdá is in the deed of making, and in the things most amazingly made, wherefore he passes ever on to some new brilliant work. So, they are the world's life, eternal progress and every new discovery is theirs. Thus was the habitation of the ahurás or immortals established in eternity and infinite vastness of Vohümanö or wonderful wit/vision of GOD, See Yasna 39.3.
This beautiful doctrine has also a physical dimension, in that each of the immortals is linked with one of the “creations” (Middle Persian. dahišnān), which the ancient Iranian thinkers held made up the world. These links are systematically listed in the Zand and later middle Persian texts, and each of them is subtly mentioned in the poetic Gāthās, where Zoroaster sometimes names the creation in order to represent the divinity, and vice versa. The first to realize this, among Western scholars, was H. Lommel; the grandson of the great philosopher Hegel. The doctrine of the auspicious immortals thus links spiritual, ethical, and material in a manner, unique to to Zoroastrianism. As Lommel puts it; the doctrine represents an ancient, mystical way of looking at reality, at a time when, it seems, “abstract and concrete . . . appeared to the human spirit as of unified being, the abstract as the inner reality of the concrete, so that, for instance, perfect contemplation/ serenity and the earth were the spiritual and material aspects of the same thing” (B. Schlerath, ed., Zarathustra, pp. 31-32). The link between the creations and the spiritual immortals is reaffirmed in the 5 daily acts of worship everyday, so to say that they are mere abstracts is ignoring the fact, that real/true knowledge is alive, knows and affects.
ardeshir

måndagen den 1:e februari 2010

Liberalism vs Orthodoxy (The Case for Orthodox Zoroastrianism)

Dear Parviz and Ardeshir

I actually find it very interesting that "liberal" and "orthodox" are not opposites but rather the same thing within Zoroastrianism. In thise sense we are all thre eboth liberal and orthodox and I'm happy to call myself an orthodox Zoroastrian too.
It seems deifferences are rather between which texts we find important and how we relate to them (if giving priority to texts at all).

Ushta
Alexander

2010/2/1 Parviz Varjavand

Hi Ardeshir,

As you may know by now, I do not accept the authority of any Sacred Book be it the Denkart or The Tibetan Book of the Dead, I accept the authority of clear thinking minds expressing their ideas in as plain a language as even a child can understand. Plain talking is the greatest art in Philo-Sophia or Mazda-Yasna. The most important persons we should be talking to are children because it is their fresh minds that is being formed by our talks to them. As for Dastoor Kotwal or others of his rank wanting to debate you, "Good Luck", they are too busy hiding behind their interpretations of their Sacred Books (Vandidad and the likes) mumbling to themselves pronouncements that only they can decipher.

I do understand English to some degree, but when it comes to understanding what you are trying to express, I am still at a loss. You say "by hostile energies/forces i mean "angra" and other limiting energies that believe in determinism and fixed, bleak world". Do these "hostile energies" exist in our minds created by the way we think or do they have an existence independent of our minds? Where do "the hostile influences and forces which would have the creation stick as tightly as possible to the disorder, unregenerate habits and ugliness to which it has been reduced.(A.F.)" come from? Do you believ that they are the "TWIN" of the Good Forces, as the Gatha seems to suggest?

Ushta te,
Parviz Varjavand

P.S. May you not give me "Good Forces have "Existance" while bad forces have "Non-Existance" just as Darkness is the absence of Light"; that answere is such a joke, philosophically speaking.


--- On Sun, 1/31/10, ardeshir farhmand wrote:

From: ardeshir farhmand
Subject: Re: [Ushta] Is Zoroastrianism really dualistic??? ///A View!
To: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, January 31, 2010, 1:28 PM

Hi Parviz,

My views are very orthodox, if u read or accept the authority of Denkard or any other ancient exegesis; u will find out that the whole body of our avestan literature and their commentaries has been formed as a footnote to and a commentary around the enchanting gathas.

dr jaffary merely reminded the zoroastrians of this forgotten FACT, he did not invent something new in that aspect. however, his utter dismissal of the ancient exegesis and reliance on western scholars instead, and his mechanical science txt-book translation are his unique approach.

there is a diffrence between orthodoxy and orthopraxy or concieved orthopraxy. furthermore, i cite my sources, and i believe every traditionalist should do the same. so if u do not agree with me, ask mr.mistry or dastoor kotwal to please cite their opposition, i think it would be lively debate.

now, as far as what u did not seem to be clear on; by hostile energies/forces i mean "angra" and other limiting energies that believe in determinism and fixed, bleak world

ardeshir.

On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 1:08 PM, Parviz Varjavand wrote:

Hi Ardeshir,

High Dastoor Kotwal calls his views of Zoroastrianism as being "The Orthodox Views" (in his Harvard papers) and the best teacher of the Orthodox Views today is Khojeste Mistry of Zoroastrian Studies, Bombay. To base all that Zoroastrianism IS on the Gathas is a path that Ali Akbar Jafarey made popular and is a close parallel to how Islam is based primarily on the Sacred Koran. So, I do not agree that there is anything Orthodox about your views, you are inventing your vision of Zoroastrianism as much as anyone else coming up with fresh ideas about it today. We would love to hear your views, but please do not try to protect yourself behind the shield that your views are Orthodox while that of others are not.

Since in a post of yours that followed this, you seem to feel that this post of yours is very important, I took the time to read it many times. I may be a dunce, but the more I read, the less I understood what your exact vision of our Din is. For example, could you please explain to me what you are trying to say in this passage:

>>"According to the enchanting Gathic teachings; to suggest that everything is equally the will of God is a very convenient suggestion of the hostile influences and forces which would have the creation stick as tightly as possible to the disorder, unregenerate habits and ugliness to which it has been reduced."<< A.F.

I would appreciate your kind patience with me.
Parviz Varjavand


--- On Sun, 1/31/10, ardeshir farhmand wrote:

From: ardeshir farhmand
Subject: [Ushta] Is Zoroastrianism really dualistic??? ///An orthodox View
To: Ushta@yahoogroups. com
Cc: "mehrdad farahmand"
Date: Sunday, January 31, 2010, 9:11 AM


Hi Martin,

Welcome to ushta, an intellectual zoroastrian discussion group. i am an orthodox zoroastrian and here is the the orthodox view/take on ur question.

Zoroastrianism has been labeled as a dualistic faith, mostly since its coming into contact with biblical religions/culture. To begin with, comparing biblical tradition with Mazdyasna/Zoroastri anism is not a wise or correct approach. They come from vastly different cultural and historical backgrounds and understanding Zoroastrianism in biblical terms leads only to confusion and misunderstanding of Zoroastrianism. A better approach would be comparing the compatible Vedic and Vedantic tradition and/or ancient Norse literature with Mazdyasna.

An important part/element of the above dualism charge against Zoroastrianism has its roots in the notion that since all things owe their origin to God/Divine Source, all their activities also proceed directly from God. According to the poetic Gathas and the established Zoroastrian tradition it is truly a TERRIBLE theory to attribute all that takes place as God's direct working.

According to the enchanting Gathic teachings; to suggest that everything is equally the will of God is a very convenient suggestion of the hostile influences and forces which would have the creation stick as tightly as possible to the disorder, unregenerate habits and ugliness to which it has been reduced.

According to the enchanting songs of Zarathushtra the ultimate nature/origin of the world/existence is "khratü" or "speñtá mainyü" or Vohümanö; described respectively as an insight/wisdom/ will that knows, effects and realizes, an auspicious spirit/understandin g, and an energy, passion, spirit, wit/awareness which is imbued with awe, wonder, beauty and amazement. (look at the third line of Yasna 28.1, the fifth line of Yasna 44.7 and the first line of Yasna 34.2.)

Yet, despite the world's divine origin, here in the material nature the "foresight, wisdom and vision/mazdá," is veiled by ignorance, inconscience, interia and lack of vision; and what takes place here does NOT proceed directly from the divine meta-knowledge.

Hence evil is closely associated with lack of vision and growth (Yasna 30.3,) and is a non-being, non-living phenomenon (Yasna 30.4,) a truly non-existent delusion or "drüj."

When Vohümanö is established its rule in the world, then the world will be a genuine expression of the divine will/wisdom. It is the struggle between the outdated/old/ stagnated and the vibrant/growing/ fresh and new that forms the crux of our religion (Yasna 34.15.)

The truth/ashá of Vohümanö/vast wit and vision; has got mistranslated, tainted and distorted (Yasna 32.9.)

We see the falsehood in the world and the distortion of the pristine truths, and realize that this illusion must be replaced with the pristine energy and passion that manifested this creation. And to express the pristine vision, spiritual wisdom and progress in every thought, word and act is indeed our beautiful religion (See the thirld line of Yasna 28.11.)

Ardeshir

Zoroastrianism vs Judaism

Dear Martin

Please note that the concept of sin does not exist in Zoroastrianism.
It is basically an ethical philosophy and not a moralizing religion like the Abrahamic religions.
We do not have any commandments but merely believe that our actions become one with ourselves.
THIS is why it is important to us what we think, say and how we act.
But there are no preset rules in Zoroastrianism. Not judgment day towards which we are reponsible for our actions. We are only responsible to ourselves and our fellow human beings.

Ushta
Alexander

2010/1/31 Martin Grossmann


That is going pretty well for the beginning ;)

Well to your statements Bahman. Thank your for explanation of Dualism and also wanted to thank the previous poster but cant remember his name ;)

Now to the jewish and refering to the things you mentioned.

In Judaism a physical entity as satan as a special angel or opposing force doesnt exist. In the hebrew bible, the world "ha-satan" is meaning "the opposing / accusing one" and refers mostly to various angels, that are taking the position of a prosecutor towards humankind and its evil deeds. But still as angels, they are controlled by g-d and have no free will. They are mostly send by g-d to test mens loyalty to his ehtical and moral principles.
So basically ha-Satan is not an equal opposing negative force, but certainly pre-existant and still part of this eternal and universal balance.
A interesting as it is, in the story of creation, the serpent is never mentioned to be ha-Satan (and certainly ha-Satan mentioned in the other scripture has never had a physical appearance), but is seen to be figurative or a symbol for the sin, that persuaded men to break the covenant. That is why in Gen. 3:15, the Almighty is talking directly to the serpent and cursing it (another viewpoint, why not ha-Satan can be meant since its not under g-ds control and so resulting out of free will of humankind).

The christian interpretation later stated a diffuse interpretation, that resulted in following Christianity a dualis approach although it is based on Judaism, that doesnt have one in the methaphysical sense (meaning a bad and good force, but that evil results out of the will of men to do bad things)

Now to the second point. Certainly if man was created by g-d and he had full control over his creation and created a sinful creature, then that would mean he has to be sinful too. Now that is partly correct. Since everything else that exists besides men is under his control as an eternal and universal deity, everything else in in balance and so you cant contribute to it a certain characteristic.

As the saying goes....g-d is everything and nothing.
The reason why men, as his greatest creation, is sinful derives from the fact, that we have been given free will. If we wouldnt have free will, we wouldnt need a covenant or a savior. With free will, we expand over natural and ethical limits.

But you are right. Still he would have to be existant in men since he is a part of them as its creator. But men is not born bad or good, is it ? We become sinful throughout our lives by influences from our surrounding.

Now that was the jewish viewpoint and hope I could clear some stuff up. Thank you for the great interest and that is why I joined this channel ;)

Have a nice day.






2010/1/31 Bahman Noruziaan


Hello Marcin,

The Dualism of the Gathas refers to after creation of the world as we see. Dualism in my understanding, appears to have been the necessity of the world to come about, based on Zarathushtra's vision.
The dual entities were the primal building blocks of this universe. They however, in human's mind, are interpreted as better and the worst. They manifest themselves in our being (thoughts, words and deeds as good and bad). There is no dualism in the nature of Ahura Mazda, but its material creation.


Referring to what wyou wrote as:

"The creation of men (and the existence of evil deeds and actions) challenged this balance and so evil became existent."
I am not sure how Judaism then explains the rebellion of Satan against Yehwa's will and its act of deceiving Eve and as a result Adam? Was not this act, an evil act, a sin, which is attributed to Satan that pre-existed man?



Also you wrote:
"The Creation of Men changed this balance and Sin (as human trademark) is seen in Judaism as the opposing force towards the balance made by this universal deity."
Now, if man which is a creation of Yehowa was capable of Sin, then was not it embedded in the blueprint of its making, which was planned by Yehowa?
So, how the deity created a potentially sinful creation, if itself is devoid of any sin?

Regards

To: Ushta@yahoogroups.com
From: marcin.grossman@googlemail.com
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2010 03:03:11 +0100
Subject: [Ushta] QUESTION DUALISM [BEGINNER]



Dear Friends,

I am new to this group and interested in the zoroastrian religious ( or philosophical ) views.

Please correct any of my thinking processes, since I am new to this.
As I understand, the Zoroastrains believe in Dualism as existent in a positive and negative entity. If that is so, then I would like to understand following. If we say that dualism (for example interaction of a good divine entity and bad divine entity) is something that surrounds any particle in the universe, then it should have existed already before the creation of men. But since nature or universe itself is always in balance, there is never really an out-of-balance state, meaning that you logically cant call either of the two forces positive or negative. Evil doesnt exist in nature or the universe since there is no cause to it. The creation of men (and the existence of evil deeds and actions) challenged this ballance and so evil became existent.

I am jewish and judaism is not based on dualism. As explained, I see no confirmation in the existence of two opposing forces if a. everything is in balance and b. therefore you cannot attribute them (by saying this one is positive and this one is negative).

Following this statements, I support the idea that if the divine deity exists, it should logically be one spiritual and universal deity with no physical or philosophical trait (no dualism).

The Creation of Men changed this balance and Sin (as human trademark) is seen in Judaism as the opposing force towards the balance made by this universal deity. So maybe I would call it dualism between balance and inbalance, but between Humankind and its creator. And since this creator existed before humankind, you cant attribute any trademarks to him and so dualism cant exist. (or is always in balance what makes it unnecessary to distinguish between these forces)

I see no logical signal for the existence of a negative entity ( as the devil or bad spirit ) equal to g-d.

Could you explain to me, how Zoroastrians are viewing this situation and what kind of role men is playing in it ?

Thank your for your time and reading.

Best regards,

Marcin